THE MAILMAN WENT UA (A VIETNAM MEMOIR)

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5.0 out of 5 stars, Highly recommend. Insightful, by Robert Tschacher

Excellent read. Made you feel like you were right there in the mud and the grime and the difficulties these guys experienced daily, not to mention the horrors.


5.0 out of 5 stars, Great book, by Herc (Scotland)

I have been having a Vietnam-war memoir fest- this is a very enjoyable book which adds to the knowledge of how war on the ground felt to the mainly very young soldiers


5.0 out of 5 stars, Great account of the horrors of war, by Deke Schlicher

I read this book non-stop page 1 to the end. Great lessons on life are held in these pages. The terror that is faced by young men sent off to war. Since I am also a fellow Marine, this brought back so many memories, both good and bad.

This is a book of memories I would highly recommend to veterans as well as those of you who are not vets. It will help you understand the sacrifice and what vets must endure. Thank you, Mr. Mulldune

4.0 out of 5 stars, pretty damn good book...glad you made it back, soldier..every day is gravy after getting out if there!, by Dan

Gutsy, intriguing Real... Any of us who made it out of there will identify with the visceral wording of this book ...semper fi, soldier.. Semper fi


4.0 out of 5 stars, Combat's Harsh Realism, by Robert Williams

Mr. Mulldune's memoir presents a very stark picture of the harsh life of a combat soldier during his tour in Vietnam. The horror of combat, constant threat and fear of injury and death. Fatigued beyond reason, and the constant heat, humidity, and absurd tactic's of fighting a guerilla war are made clear in Mr. Mulldune book. Our Vietnam veterans were brave beyond belief, but returned home to a public that had been poisoned by the leftist media and TV. That made it even more difficult for a returning vet to make sense of what he had endured and lost. I gave it four stars only because some parts of the book are somewhat unclear in the transition of Mr. Mulldune's story. However, in total the book holds your attention and overall makes the authors point clear that war is harsh, brutal and ultimately destructive of the human spirit, but somehow he survived, and now is trying to make sense of it all.


5.0 out of 5 stars, A true soldier, by David R. Herridge

Having been there in 1966-1967 I understand completely how he feels. Even though I was in the Army, we appreciated the Marines in many ways. They are true hero's. I would think every recruit would be advised to read the book to understand what war is.


5.0 out of 5 stars, Page Turner, by Jurrian Beuker

I started reading this book one evening and it was good. The next morning I started again and finished it that afternoon. I did not eat breakfast or lunch and did not have a hot drink until I finished it. Now I Iike to eat and any book that stops me eating has got to get a rating of 5.


5.0 out of 5 stars, This is a one of kind story, by Francisco Duran

I am a history buff and I have read many personal accounts and memoirs of wars but I have never ever read an account quite like Mr. Mulldune's account of the Vietnam war. Its the most gritty and graphic memoir of war you will ever read but at the same time it is a good read that shows how terrible war truly is.


5.0 out of 5 stars, Excellent book, by Les Braden

David Mulldune was able to make me feel like I was an 18 or 19 year-old Marine in the middle of a war in Vietnam. A hard book to put down after the reader starts reading.


4.0 out of 5 stars, "...no matter what life throws at you, never, ever give up", by Michelangelo Jack (Auckland, New Zealand)

The author takes the reader along with him, we experience inhumane boot camp training of 10-weeks. When in 'Nam he thinks about his home and family - moving. 13-months later in the war zone "One thing for sure. If you don't like something, change will occur". He also asks "Can I ever be a human being again?" The author had definite goals on what he wanted to achieve in this book, I believe he has succeeded. I felt I was along for the ride right there with him.

His comments about the Russian SKS 7.62 weapon; M-14 and M-16 very interesting. A useful Glossary at the end is a bonus.

4.0 out of 5 stars, My review, by dkscott923 (Denver Colorado)

Who am I to review a writing so raw and from the gut by someone who survived the Vietnam experience? I appreciated the read but more so I appreciate the author for sharing so many gut-wrenching experiences lest we forget just what happened in Vietnam. I'm 62 and know too many of my generation were lost in that war. Diane


5.0 out of 5 stars, Frontline view of war...war is hell, by S. McDowell (Greenville, SC United States)

I agree with Mulldune. If every politician had to serve on the front lines during a war there would be a lot less of them. This book is straight up. There is no beating around the bush in it's description of the life and times of being a grunt on the front lines in Vietnam. It's funny at times, especially during the down times between absolute fear and oh hum boredom. That's the way of life in the combat arms at war.


 4.0 out of 5 stars, Mailman went UA, by Glenn A. Wallace "Captain Caveman" (San Diego, Calif) (REAL NAME)

Many books written by men who were there. The Mailman Went UA is a no nonsense story of what he saw.


5.0 out of 5 stars, Great word by word account of the war, by Clarence Cherry

Enjoyed the actual telling of experience of authors account of the Vietnam War and the describing the situations he was in.

5.0 out of 5 stars, One of the best war books published, by Adam Bradford, author of The United States of Apostasy

Given to me as a gift from a very good friend, I was well pleased in receiving such a book. It is a work that was written from the heart of a warrior that had to go through hell for our freedom. When the author shared moments that were alarming, the element of surprise would hit me and I was like, "My gracious! That just happened!" I cheered for him when some small victory would come his way, like the mess hall sergeant giving him and his buddy a helmet full of fried chicken, and mourned for the losses that he wrote about.

The friend forewarned me that there were some that were "distraught" due the vocabulary used within the book. The author shared his heart and put on paper what he had seen and been through. He did not romanticize the negatives, only repeated the facts. That is truth. As the movie line goes, "You can’t handle the truth." Well, some people can’t. As Jesus stated, some will gag at a gnat but swallow a camel.

I loved this book and its human side of Veteran sacrifice and valor. Thank you David Mulldune for giving the civilian world a glimpse into reality.

5.0 out of 5 stars, Super, by Ron Bolser


This is about as true as a Marine could have said it during that time in country. It was great.


5.0 out of 5 stars, Front Row & Center (if not) Side by Side, by KATHERINE LEE (NEW YORK, NY USA)

Immediately I was thrown into the streets and whirled into Boot Camp. Through DIs and the fellow boots I was experiencing what it was like to be a Boot. Upon graduation, I felt the sense of accomplishment. I finally did it! I was a Marine. I am a Marine. A Gung Ho one, at that.

Excitement surrounded me as I was in another Country, where I was thrown around, and didn't belong until I found my Company, my Platoon, I made a few good friends there. Played games and what not on my downtime. Encountered many challenges from a not so perfect Squad Leader to an Officer who seemed to know it all. Gosh, I really didn't like that at all.

Dave, you brought me up front and alongside you in battle, through jungles. Permitted me to be with you, comfort you, and smile with you. I've to say, I've enjoyed reading your book, your personal account in the mind and tongue of a 19 year old. Purposely misspelling a few words and getting the mindset of a 19 yo into the minds of the reader :) Through day and night, by your side, I became very close to you.

I thank you for allowing me to do so, Cpl Mulldune ~ Zulu Warrior ~ HUGSAn excellent read and I highly recommend this memoir. Cpl. Mulldune set out to convey exactly as he intended to do. Job Well Done, Marine!


5.0 out of 5 stars, Good read, by Joyce Washburn (Grand Rapids, Michigan USA)

I appreciate this book because of the honest way it was written. No bragging or philosophy. Tells the real story of the Marines.


5.0 out of 5 stars, Like You were Back There!, by Anthony Lovatt

Very, very good! Like you were there. Told like we were there. Awesome. I've read many Vietnam era books...this is the best.    


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